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Five Reasons Measles is Better Than Autism

Jaclyn Harwell August 19, 2016

Five Reasons Measles is Better Than Autism

By Jaclyn, Contributing Writer

Since the CDC whistleblower case broke last year, and the documentary Vaxxed: From Cover Up to Catastrophe aired this year, the fact that the MMR vaccine DOES cause autism in some susceptible individuals can no longer be denied. We’ve written pretty extensively about both measles and autism. Still, some parents think that measles is so deadly that even if vaccines do cause autism, they’d prefer to have a child with autism than battle measles. Which is ridiculous, because measles is better than autism.

For the vast majority of children, measles is a mild illness that passes quickly. Children with autism will deal with a lifetime of struggles, and everyone around them, parents, caretakers, teachers, and siblings, are affected.

And before you cry for acceptance of neurodiversity, keep in mind, I’m referring to children with severe, regressive cases of autism, not those that are high-functioning and more self-sufficient.

Don’t tell me you’d rather take your chances with autism than expose your child to measles. Measles is better than autism.

Five Reasons Measles is Better Than Autism

The argument that you’d rather take your chances with autism than face the possibility of measles or some other ” vaccine-preventable” disease makes no sense. If you’ve done any research on the matter, you’ll find that in the majority of outbreaks, most affected people have, indeed, been vaccinated.

Not only are the chances of developing autism following vaccinations much higher than we’ve been led to believe, but the efficacy of vaccinations is questionable at best.

Here are five reasons to choose this benign childhood disease over autism.

Measles Imparts Lifelong Immunity

You know what’s great about getting measles? Once you have it as a kid, most people acquire an immunity to it forever. The antibodies that are created when you naturally catch childhood diseases help your immune system to know how to fight off the sickness when you’re exposed again at a later time. (In rare cases, measles immunity isn’t lifelong.)

Vaccine-induced “immunity” wanes in a matter of years and cannot compare to natural immunity.

You know what’s great about autism? Nothing. When you “catch it,” it’s there to stay, imparting no future gifts of immunity. Children don’t just “get over” autism without serious healing efforts.

Note: I’m just being cute. I know you can’t “catch” autism and it’s not contagious. However, most cases of autism occur following exposure to some insult to the immune system, such as vaccines, pharmaceutical drugs, or environmental toxins. Are some children born with autism? Probably. Do some children who were never given vaccines or pharmaceutical drugs have autism? Yes.

There is no doubt, though, that regressive autism occurs. One study concludes, “The mass of scientific evidence compiled by researchers clearly indicates that the incidence of autism occurs following vaccination and is most closely associated with the schedule of vaccines culminating in the MMR vaccine.” (source)

Autism is a big deal. It’s not something to take lightly, and it is worse than measles. We need to stop saying that autism isn’t a big deal and call it what it is: vaccine damage, toxicity, and poor gut health.

You know what’s not a big deal? Measles. Did you know that according to this CDC document (page 85), between 1950 and 1960, there was less than 1 death per 100,000 in the US, which is 0.00001%, or about 1 in 100,000.

Out of the 1,153 cases reported from 2001-2013, there were no deaths. (source)

If you get measles, you have a 99.7% chance of pulling through just fine. Want to read more in depth? Check out “Is Measles REALLY So Scary?

Measles Strengthens the Immune System

Not only does measles give you immunity to future exposures to it, it also strengthens your immune system so you can avoid other future illnesses, including autoimmune disease and even cancer.

You see, our bodies were actually created to get these regular, normal workouts throughout childhood. Just like our muscles need use to grow and become strong, so our immune systems need to be used in order to bulk up and prepare to fight off invaders.

Instead of catching what used to be normal childhood illnesses, most kids are vaccinated against them, providing a false sense of immunity and overloading the immune system. So now, children have weakened immune systems that allow them to catch every common cold and suffer from frequent ear infections. Suffering through one week of discomfort with an illness like measles is surely preferable to long-term, frequent and annoying illnesses.

Having autism actually destroys the immune system. If you know the real cause of autism, you understand that autism develops due to a compromised immune system, then the underlying causes of autism continue to wreck the immune system. It’s a vicious cycle.

Autism Causes Long-Term Damage

For the vast majority of children, measles will be a short-term, uncomfortable illness. They’ll get a fever; they’ll have a rash; they’ll get to stay home from school (or skip their home school work), which kids are always angling for anyways. Yeah, being sick isn’t necessarily fun, but it’s a rite of passage for childhood.

Once the child’s immune system has fought off measles, thereby receiving lifelong immunity, they’re back at ’em in no time (kids are so resilient, you know).

When a child gets autism? There’s no easy bouncing back. A bowl of chicken soup ain’t gonna solve this problem (though soup can help to heal autism).

Autism results in long-term neurological damage with can affect a child for lifetime, though there are children who recover through the hard work of their warrior mamas! Indeed, many studies, including this one, have found that gut health has a profound impact on the behaviors of those on the autism spectrum, and interventions such as diet and probiotic supplementation may be helpful.

Measles is Easier to Cure Than Autism

There’s actually no cure for measles. Know why? Because it’s a benign childhood disease.

After some rest and time, and maybe some cod liver oil for vitamin A, most children are good as new in no time. ( Vitamin A treatment has been found to lower measles death rates by 62%!) (source)

The general consensus in the medical community is that there is no cure for autism. That’s actually not true, autism can be cured, but it’s not a walk in the park. Healing autism involves intensive intestinal healing, expensive supplements, and plenty of time and patience, but it certainly can be done.

Wouldn’t it be nice, though, if autism was as easy to heal from as measles. Hmm… with the fear surrounding measles, and the flippant attitude towards autism, you’d think it was the other way around.

Measles Complications Are Uncommon

Less than one thousand people per year get measles in the US, and only one death has been confirmed in over a decade (and even then, the cause of death was arguably due to something else, as the woman had a number of conditions contributing to poor immune function, and the measles virus was only found during an autopsy, as she had no symptoms. [source] It’s possible the measles vaccine she received- yes, she had been vaccinated- was actually the reason the virus was found in her body).

The latest estimates show 1 in 45 children in the US have autism. (sourceThat’s about 1,478,837 kids, or about 2%.

The places where typically mild diseases are more likely to have complications are the places that struggle with poor sanitation and nutrition, like third world countries. When we read statements like “Measles is one of the leading causes of death among young children even though a safe and cost-effective vaccine is available,” but fail to read on and learn that 95% of these deaths occur in third world countries, we’re making decisions based on fear, not facts. (source)

The death of a child is always sad, but we need to look at the facts: 114,900 people die from measles a year, globally, the majority being under the age of five. That’s about .002% of the world’s population. It’s estimated that 1% of the world’s population has autism. That’s 71,250,000 people.

There is no doubt, autism is more common than measles complications in the US and other developed nations. While rare but serious complications of measles can lead to death, a child is more likely to suffer from autism following an MMR vaccination than to catch measles at all, let alone have very serious complications.

Is Measles Better Than Autism?

You bet. As we can clearly see, the odds of catching measles, and especially suffering from complications, are much lower than the chance of being diagnosed with autism.

Not only that, but once you get over measles, you move on in better health. Autism can have lifelong implications for both sufferers and their families.

It’s time we stop taking chances with our children’s health and making decisions based on well-calculated propaganda. Look at the facts and make the best choices for your kids based on the real risks, not hyped-up figures and half-truths.

Do you think measles is better than autism? Share so your friends can read the facts too.

Five Reasons Measles is Better Than Autism

 

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When Jaclyn became a mom more than eight years ago, health food was the last thing on her mind, but when her oldest son began to struggle with behavioral problems early in life, she dove in headfirst to begin learning about how to live and eat naturally. Since then, her children have been healed of eczema and digestive problems and her own thyroid disorder has been healed. Best of all, her son’s behavior continues to improve as he heals through diet. As she continues to fight for her family’s health and well-being, Jaclyn focuses on GAPS-diet and Paleo foods with an emphasis on nourishing and healing foods like broth and homemade sauerkraut. You can find her writing about raising a healthy, happy family at www.thefamilythathealstogether.com.
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26 Comments

  1. Great article

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  2. I wish I’d had measles, instead I’m stuck with pancreatic death, lifelong insulin injections and blood testing day in and day out so I can digest food. 31 years and counting as a immmune compromised pharmaceutical slave. See top of page 7 under Adverse Reactions on Merck’s own vaccine insert: https://www.merck.com/product/usa/pi_circulars/m/mmr_ii/mmr_ii_pi.pdf

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  3. This is an excellent article. Concise, humorous, and very, very factual. Thank you for writing this. Sharing!

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  4. Yes my son has had measles and it almost killed him, it was caused from the measles vaccine itself! Then when it came time for the booster vaccine they promised me he wouldn’t have the same reaction, well he didn’t get the measles the second time, but it was also pretty severe reaction and very scary to watch him go through it again! I was not a happy camper to say the least!

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  5. Since the measles vaccine does not cause autism, we don’t have to choose!

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    • Um, except that in the USA, you can’t get the vaccines that make up MMR separately…

      And yes, while they seen in on their own, the measles, mumps and rubella vaccines when mixed are what seems to cause the autism leap…

      So, yes, excuse me while I don’t vaccinate my infant for things that could cause mild irritation for a week or so. I’d rather take a week off of work to take care of her than deal with Autism outburts, like my bff has to. Her son is 6 and very violent, and is about to go spend time in a psych ward thanks to his autism, which had been high functioning as a toddler but now with all the school required vaccinations done, has gone spiraling out of control off a cliff..

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      • The MMR does not cause autism, according to scientific consensus.

        Also, measles can cause lifetime disability or death. We don’t see it in big numbers in the US anymore because most people are vaccinated. Herd immunity is working.

        We vaccinate our children because we feel the risks of vaccinating are less than the risks of the diseases.

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        • Oh dear, you seriously need to at least watch “Vaxxed,” and read “Dissolving Illusions” by Dr. Humphries. That would be a start, if you aren’t a troll.

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          • I prefer to get my information from credible sources. Not “documentaries” directed by fraudulent ex-doctors.

          • This is for Angela’s reply to Sue – From credible sources, I have to assume she means those with major conflicts of interest. But if that’s what she wants to believe, that’s fine with me. Everyone should have that choice. One can only hope they will have at least done their research from independent sources – not the drug companies, media, government who profit from vaccinations.

          • Tony-

            Were you aware of Andrew Wakefield’s conflict of interest when he published his now retracted paper?

      • Shannon, just make sure to keep your child well away from other children, so an immunocompromised child doesn’t catch measles from your child. For them it can be fatal.

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    • Also, sorry for all the typos, was breast feeding my 2 month old while reading and responding to this!

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    • Totally agree with you Angela. Non vaccination is selfish at best as we rely on a critical mass to take up vaccinations so that those who can’t (immuno compromised people etc) are protected from what can be a life threatening illness in some people.

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      • Everyone is not obligated to accept an invasive treatment so that there are less risks for your “immunocompromised”.

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      • Who’s being selfish? Last 10 -15 years, no one died from measles in the U.S., but over 100 died from the MMR vaccine. Plus, if the vaccine worked, and your kids were vaccinated, why would it matter to you who else was or was not vaccinated? But you think it’s OK for others to sacrifice their kids? That sounds selfish. In China, where there is a 99% vaccination rate, there are still measles outbreaks. If you’re immuno compromised, there are over 100 diseases for which there is no vaccine which you could be exposed to. I hope everyone does their research from independent sources.

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        • 100 died from the MMR? Citation?

          The reason we have such low incidence of measles and measles complications/deaths is because most people do vaccinate. If too many people stop vaccinating, this will change.

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          • Actually there are measles outbreaks all the time. And if tested you can bet they’d be atypical!

  6. there is a ‘cure’ for measles, vit c, which cures all viral infections, and in use for whooping cough, in 1930s http://whale.to/a/vitamin_c_banners.html

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  7. […] Imagine we’re friends. Imagine you’ve come over for the morning so our kids can play and we can chat, ya know, have some “adult time.” I’ll pour you a hot tea, because that’s what I always do when my friends come over. And we’ll sit down and I’ll broach a subject that’s been heavy on my heart. […]

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  8. I think measles and autism are two completely separate things.

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  9. Interesting. You acknowledge that there are over 100,000 deaths every year from measles, but don’t include the annual death toll from autism. Oh, wait… that’s because THERE IS NONE. And yet you expect me to believe that a disease you yourself admit is deadly in large numbers (oh, but “only in third world countries so who cares” basically) is somehow better than a neurological disorder that is in no way deadly? That’s specious reasoning, and extremely illogical.

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  10. Vaccines do not cause autism! There are literally 100s of studies that prove this. Measles on the other hand can have life long consequences such as weakened immune systems and even death,just look up SSPE. Autism has been around for years prior to vaccines, it was often not diagnosed and these kids were considered “trouble” instead of receiving the help and care they needed. Because of genetics and humans defying survival of the fittest, these people breed and autism continues. It has nothing to do with vaccines. Find a better argument.

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  11. “Measles is better than autism”
    Just thought I’d let you know that I, an autistic person can confirm that measles were a lot worse than my great exam results, hyperfocus and extensive knowledge of subjects that interest me.
    Of course, you must think I’m too ‘high-functioning’ to be the kind of person you’re talking about. Functioning labels are pointless and meaningless. Yes, I can talk to people and go to school, but that doesn’t mean I don’t get meltdowns because of loud noises, during which I pull out my own hair and scratch myself until I bleed and times when I can’t talk because too much is touching me.
    All autistic people have things they’re good at and bad at, it doesn’t make them high or low functioning.
    Also, I’d much rather not make eye contact than have an easily preventable disease. I’ve been told that I’m more honest and easy to understand than allistic (non autistic) people.
    Furthermore, autism can’t be cured and I wouldn’t want to be anyway. Being autistic is part of me and if a cup of soup ‘cured’ me, I’d be a totally different and unrecognisable person.
    Sure, meltdowns and shutdowns are an inconvenience, but I would have had dozens because of illnesses if I hadn’t been vaccinated (because, by the way, I’d still be autistic).
    And I’m sure my dad is much happier being a well respected accountant than constantly ill because so many people like you didn’t vaccinate their kids that herd immunity failed and his immune system couldn’t fight off all the childhood illnesses he avoided with vaccines.
    By the way, autism will be with me for my whole life and that doesn’t mean I’ll fail. My sensory and social issues will continue, but I’ll probably do a lot better than some people because of the skills I have because of my autism.
    Sincerely, a very irritated teenager who was hyperfocsued enough on how angry you made me to write this comment because, surprise, autism.

    Reply

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I’m Kate, mama to 5 and wife to Ben.  I love meeting new people and hearing their stories.  I’m also a big fan of “fancy” drinks (anything but plain water counts as ‘fancy’ in my world!) and I can’t stop myself from DIY-ing everything.  I sure hope you’ll stick around so I can get to know you better!

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